Monthly Archives: February 2014

11 Social Media Conferences Every Marketer Should Know for 2014

Vaniceseasonal's Blog

Thanks;Courtney Seiter    

Posted on Monday, February 24th, 2014

Image

Having a job in social media is sort of weird.

There are still lots of people who might think you’re just “on Facebook” all day while in reality you’ve got a big job: figuring out your social media strategy, perfecting the right times to postunderstanding your analyticsand building strong connections with your community.

That’s why it’s nice to be able to take some time to connect with others who have the same challenges as you. Luckily, there are lots of great social media conferences worth your time.

But how do you know which conference is right for you? We asked Jason Keath, CEO of Social Fresh (more on that conference in a minute), to help us out with that question.

“Most events will list a ton of information about the event online ahead of time. And…

View original post 2,115 more words

11 Social Media Conferences Every Marketer Should Know for 2014

Thanks;    

Posted on Monday, February 24th, 2014

Image

Having a job in social media is sort of weird.

There are still lots of people who might think you’re just “on Facebook” all day while in reality you’ve got a big job: figuring out your social media strategy, perfecting the right times to postunderstanding your analyticsand building strong connections with your community.

That’s why it’s nice to be able to take some time to connect with others who have the same challenges as you. Luckily, there are lots of great social media conferences worth your time.

But how do you know which conference is right for you? We asked Jason Keath, CEO of Social Fresh (more on that conference in a minute), to help us out with that question.

“Most events will list a ton of information about the event online ahead of time. And more events are offering online networking opportunities before the event through communities, email lists or Facebook groups,” he says.

“Take advantage by researching the schedule, speakers (even watch past video of them), sponsors, attendees and the venue. Pick out companies, speakers, sessions that will make your trip the most productive to focus on.”

We’ve gotten you started on your research by collecting 11 (and a half!) social media conferences every marketers should know about for 2014. Read on to hear their pitch, see details of each and check out some tweets from past participants.

After you’ve picked the right event, read on for great tips from speakers and organizers on making the most of your conference experience!

One note: This list is only U.S. events, but I’d love to gather up a future list of great conferences worldwide. Let me know your picks in the comments!

 

1. Social Fresh Conference

Image

Social Fresh has two conferences a year, but first up in 2014 is East. Stay tuned on their site for more details of Social Fresh West in San Diego this fall.
What: “Social Fresh is the social media conference you have always hoped for. We keep it simple and focus on quality content with actionable insights. No panels. Just one speaker at a time focused on success stories and tactics. One track. We curate a single track of great speakers, so you don’t have to. Real quality networking. Enjoy multiple happy hours, speed networking, snack breaks and a brainstorming event to meet and get to know other social professionals.”
When: July 17-18
Where: Orlando, FL
Cost: $597-$1,097 (Use promo code “BUFFER” for a 10% discount!)
Organizer: Social Fresh Conference
Speakers: Social media strategist and Youtility author Jay Baer and social and digital strategist Sarah Evans are confirmed so far.
Best for: With one track and one room, this one’s great for hyper-focused networking and getting face time with speakers.
Random Tweet:

Image

Social Media Marketing World

Image

 

What: “Social Media Marketing World 2014 is the world’s largest social media marketing conference. By attending, you’ll make connections with 80+ of the world’s top social media pros (plus 2,000 of your peers) and you’ll discover amazing ideas that’ll transform your social media marketing.”
When: March 26-28th, 2014
Where: San Diego, CA
Cost: $1,097-$1,297
Organizer: Social Media Examiner
Speakers: The Impact Equation author Chris Brogan, Facebook marketing expert Mari Smith and social media strategist Jay Baer, among others.
Best for: Social media generalists looking for a deep dive into strategies and tactics.
Random Tweet:

 UserConf

Image

 

What: “UserConf is the only conference of its kind, built to bring education and insight to people working in customer support and community management. We think customer support is just as important as sales and marketing. We tried to find a conference that reflected these values. We couldn’t. So we created UserConf, a conference for people like us.”
When: May 2, 2014
Where: Chicago, IL
Cost: $249-$349
Organizer: UserVoice and CoSupport
Speakers: None announced yet, but past speakers have included folks from companies like MailChimp, Vimeo, Microsoft, WordPress, AirBnB, and Uber.
Best for: Community managers or social media managers heavily focused on customer support.
Random Tweet:

 Image

What: “The Corporate Social Media Summit is the largest and most senior meeting of social media and marketing execs, giving you unrivaled insight into how social can drive your business growth & competitive advantage.”
When: June 16-17, 2014
Where: New York, NY
Cost: $1,395-$2,195
Organizer: Useful Social Media
Speakers: 2014 speakers include Dow Jones & Company Chief Communications Officer Paula Keve, MetLife Chief Customer Officer Claire M. Burns and Century 21 Chief Marketing Officer Bev Thorne.
Best for: Well established and/or senior social media practitioners.
Random Tweet:

 MozCon

Image

What: “Three days of forward-thinking, actionable sessions on SEO, social media, community building, content marketing, brand development, CRO, the mobile landscape, analytics, and more. MozCon speakers share next-level advice on everything from building a loyal community to making data-driven decisions in your marketing.”
When: July 14-16, 2014
Where: Seattle, WA
Cost: $799-$1,299
Organizer: Moz
Speakers: Moz’s Rand Fishkin, The Web Psychologist author Nathalie Nahai, Wil Reynolds of SEER Interactive and more.
Best for: Cross-trained social media marketers who also dabble in (or want to learn more about) SEO, analytics and more.
Random Tweet:

 

Content Marketing World

Image

 

What: “Content Marketing World is the one event where you can learn and network with the best and the brightest in the content marketing industry. You will leave with all the materials you need to take a content marketing strategy back to your team – and – to implement a content marketing plan that will grow your business and inspire your audience.”
When: Sept. 8-11, 2014
Where: Cleveland, OH
Cost: $495-$2,395
Organizer: Content Marketing Institute
Speakers: 2014 speakers include such brands as Kraft Foods, Microsoft, Facebook, SAP, Cisco Systems and Coca-Cola Brazil.
Best for: Social media managers with a content marketing focus.
Random Tweet:

 Inbound 2014

Image

What: “Join thousands of marketing and sales professionals from around the globe for the world’s most remarkable business event. INBOUND provides attendees with the inspiration, education, and connections needed to transform their businesses to match the way purchasing behaviors are evolving in a connected and digital world.”
When: September 15-18, 2014
Where: Boston, MA
Cost: $749-$1,499
Organizer: HubSpot
Speakers: 2013′s event included talks from Arianna Huffington, President & Editor in Chief of Huffington Post; author Seth Godin; Scott Harrison, CEO & Founder of charity: water; and FiveThirtyEight.com founder Nate Silver.
Best for: Big-picture social media strategy and inspiration; seeing big name speakers.
Random Tweet:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=49Fo3k8jfqI

Social Shakeup

Image

What: “This isn’t Social Media 101: this is a celebration of how social media practitioners are creating exciting new ways to connect people within and outside the enterprise – customers, employees, managers and leaders. It’s an exploration of how we’re shaking up traditional organizations and communication channels to create a brand new form of business: the Social Enterprise.”
When: September 16-17, 2014
Where: Atlanta, GA
Cost: Prices ranged from $497-$1,299 for 2013′s event; they haven’t been announced yet for 2014.
Organizer: Social Media Today
Speakers: 2013′s event had speakers including Coca-Cola Digital Strategy & Content Director Neil Bedwell, The Body Shop Director of Brand Communications & Values Jennifer Barckley and Bravo Senior Social Media Manager Abigail Cusick.
Best for: In-house social media marketers working for (or aspiring to work for) large and enterprise brands.
Random Tweet:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qk7CJqqPeSI

 Social Brand Forum

Image

What: “The Social Brand Forum, a top 10 social media conference, brings national social media and digital marketing thought leaders to Iowa’s Creative Corridor for two days of impactful keynotes and interactive discussions.”
When: Sept. 25-26, 2014
Where: Iowa (Specific location TBA)
Cost: Last year’s event cost $325; this year’s prices aren’t available yet.
Organizer: Brand Driven Digital
Speakers: Past speakers have included Spin Sucks author Gini Dietrich, Toprank’s Lee Odden,Youtility author Jay Baer and more.
Best for: Social media marketers looking for great value on a budget.
Random Tweet:

Brands-Only Summit

 

Image

 

What: “This event is focused on the core skills you need to be a successful social media executive. This two-day conference features 16 intense peer-to-peer discussions, 12 how-to classes, 12 real-world case studies, 3 brilliant authors, and 3 amazing keynotes.”
When: Oct. 27-29, 2014
Where: Orlando, FL
Cost: $1,500 plus some optional add-ons
Organizer: socialmedia.org
Speakers: None announced yet, but past speakers include folks from brands like AutoTrader.com, Salesforce.com, USAA and Best Buy.
Best for: In-house social media manager at large brands.
Random Tweet:

Image

SMX Social Media Marketing

 

Image

What: “A two-day, tactic-rich conference that covers all key issues for getting the most out of social marketing, whether you’re tasked with driving organic traffic, managing paid campaigns, or stewarding your company’s brand with online reputation management and customer service.”
When: November 19-20, 2014
Where: Las Vegas, NV
Cost: Prices for 2013′s event started at at $1,495; they haven’t been announced yet for 2014.
Organizer: SMX Social Media Marketing is programmed by the editorial team behind two leading internet marketing sites: Marketing Land and Search Engine Land.
Speakers: None announced yet, but 2013′s event had folks like Moz Director of Community Jennifer Lopez, AOL Audience Development Manager Travis Bernard and Realtor.com Director of Social Media Marketing Audie Chamberlain.
Best for: In-the-trenches social media marketers responsible for driving traffic and proving results.
Random Tweet:

Make the most of any conference

And if you’re planning on heading to one of these events, make the most of your conference experience. We asked Keath, Jennifer Lopez, Moz’s Director of Community, and Monica Wright, Director of Audience Engagement at Marketing Land, for their top tips on maxing out a conference experience. Here’s what they had to say:

Show up the day before

My best tip for getting the most out of a conference is to get there early,” Keath says. “Getting to an event a day early is a huge psychological advantage. You are not rushing or unprepared. You can learn your surroundings before most of the folks get there. And you can typically meet speakers, sponsors, organizers and other early birds without the chaos and competition of the full event as a distraction.”

Go all in

“Don’t half-ass your conference experience, go with gusto. This means focusing on the conference, the people, the sessions, not work (I know, this is a tough one for most),” Lopez says. “This sounds odd, right, since you’re going to learn for your job. But if you’re too distracted by your daily work to get anything out of the sessions, or hang out at the networking events, then what’s the point of spending all that money to be there? You should be exhausted after a conference because you’ve gone all in and made the most of it.”

Make what you learn actionable

“Make a point to see if you can condense your takeaways to 10 things to do when you get back to the office,” Wright says. “There are so many great ideas, but if you can narrow it down to the top ten things, it’s much easier to take action.”

Attend the networking events

“While the sessions are for learning tips and tactics, the networking is where the ‘goods’ happens,” Lopez says. “You make friendships, start partnerships, build communities, by talking with people. So, no sitting in your room working, get out there and talk to people.”

Organize your own event (at the event)

“Bring folks together for coffee, lunch, a late happy hour, or a morning networking event,” says Keath. “If you are a runner, get some attendees together to go for a run in the morning – it is a constructive and memorable way to bring together groups of people at an event for intros, networking, and quality discussion. (Make sure to know the event schedule and to avoid conflicting with events or vendor rules if you are a business.)”

Don’t forget logistics and details

“Some more tactical tips include staying hydrated, keep a light sweater or jacket with you,” says Wright. “If you have a portable phone charger, bring that. Having some gum or mints you can offer to your conference mates (especially after coffee breaks) is always a nice gesture.”

Ask questions!

“Whether you’re in a session and ask the speaker a question, or you tweet to them later, or ask the person next to you what they learned from the session, or what they do… learn from the people around you,” says Lopez. “It’s not just the speakers who know all the answers, it’s the other attendees as well. When you grab lunch at the conference, ask the person next to you what they work on, you’ll be amazed at how much you can learn just by asking questions. It doesn’t need to be all about you. :)”

Take a break

“Many conferences will have long days to fit in as much content as possible. You do not have to go to everything,” Keath says. “Look for sessions less relevant to your needs where you can take a break and clear your head. Take a walk, get a snack. Check out the exhibitor space. Start a conversation with other attendees.”

Did we miss your favorite event happening in 2014? Do you have a great tip for making the most of a conference experience? Let me know about it in the comments (and definitely nominate those outside-the-U.S.) events for a future list)!

P.S. If you liked this post, you might also like The 10 Most Popular Social Media Marketing Guides of the Buffer blog to Kick-start 2014 and 6 Random Social Media Tips to Help You Improve Your Marketing Today.

Countries can reverse growing inequality with the right domestic policies

Vaniceseasonal's Blog

Thanks;UN news
18 February 2014, New York

Growing inequality is neither destiny nor a necessary price to pay for economic growth according to UN DESA’s report which was released on Friday, 14 February, and national policies and institutions play a crucial role in defining inequality trends.

The Report on World Social Situation 2013: Inequality Matters, was launched during the UN Commission on Social Development, and has a special focus on policy and on the impacts of inequality, including among disadvantaged social groups.

According to the report, 7 out of 10 people live in countries where income inequality has increased in the last two decades. These include a majority of developing countries and some large emerging economies, most notably China. But income inequality has declined in a large majority of Latin American countries (14 out of 20) and in several African countries.

Unlike inequalities within countries, economic disparities across countries remain…

View original post 400 more words

Countries can reverse growing inequality with the right domestic policies

Thanks;UN news
18 February 2014, New York

Growing inequality is neither destiny nor a necessary price to pay for economic growth according to UN DESA’s report which was released on Friday, 14 February, and national policies and institutions play a crucial role in defining inequality trends.

The Report on World Social Situation 2013: Inequality Matters, was launched during the UN Commission on Social Development, and has a special focus on policy and on the impacts of inequality, including among disadvantaged social groups.

According to the report, 7 out of 10 people live in countries where income inequality has increased in the last two decades. These include a majority of developing countries and some large emerging economies, most notably China. But income inequality has declined in a large majority of Latin American countries (14 out of 20) and in several African countries.

Unlike inequalities within countries, economic disparities across countries remain high but have somewhat declined in recent decades. The mean income of a resident of Albania or the Russian Federation, for instance, is lower than that of an individual in the lowest 10 per cent of the income distribution in Sweden, who also earns 200 times more than an individual in the poorest tenth of the population in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

The report further argues that inequality affects the well-being of not only those at the bottom of the distribution, but also those at the top. For instance, as richer households typically spend a smaller share of their income than the poor, this unequal concentration of income and wealth reduces aggregate demand and slows economic growth. Inequality also slows down the pace of poverty decline and limits opportunities for social mobility, including inter-generational mobility. Inequality thus leads to a less efficient economic system and creates barriers to social development. Highly unequal societies are therefore fertile ground for political and civil unrest, instability and heightened human insecurity.

However, by tracing the recent trends, the report shows that inequality trends vary greatly by country and region. National policies and institutions play a crucial role in defining such trends.

A unique contribution of the 2013 report is that it brings special attention to the disparities that exist across five social and population groups – youth, older persons, indigenous peoples, persons with disabilities and migrants – and also illustrates how such disparities reinforce one another. The report calls for a specific policy focus on disadvantaged groups to achieve equality, including through action to end discrimination. However, it emphasizes that the targeted interventions should not become a substitute for a universal approach to social policy.

Built on positive examples of what has worked in different countries, the report offers a series of key policy recommendations. It asserts that universal social policies and strong labour market policies and institutions are necessary to contain inequality. But a policy environment conducive to sustained inequality reductions also requires macroeconomic policies oriented towards such a goal and the creation of full employment and decent work opportunities. Industrial development and economic diversification policies as well as investments in infrastructure are also needed.

The analysis and policy conclusions contained in the report are aimed at providing useful inputs for the ongoing debate and forthcoming consultations on the post-2015 development agenda, and should serve as a policy guide on socioeconomic issues.

20140219-232101.jpg

Weed Could Block H.I.V.’s Spread. No, Seriously.

Vaniceseasonal's Blog

Thanks;Abby HaglageFeb 15, 2014 5:45 am EST

But the U.S. government won’t let scientists try out this promising treatment on humans.

On a warm summer day in Chicago at the International Cannabinoid Research Conference, hundreds of marijuana researchers were giggling.

It wasn’t the groundbreaking research they’d just heard—proving the ability of THC, one of the active ingredients in marijuana, to stave off HIV (or RIV in monkeys)—that did it. Nor was it the author of the study, Dr. Patricia E. Molina, who had them laughing. It was the rogue researcher daring enough to taint the victory with a harsh dose of reality: “What’s next, testing this on humans?”

As the laughter subsided and the gravity of Dr. Molina’s results sank in, reality did too. THC is one of 500 active ingredients in marijuana. And marijuana, despite many studies proving its medical value, is sill classified by the government as a…

View original post 1,451 more words

Weed Could Block H.I.V.’s Spread. No, Seriously.

Thanks;Abby HaglageFeb 15, 2014 5:45 am EST

But the U.S. government won’t let scientists try out this promising treatment on humans.

On a warm summer day in Chicago at the International Cannabinoid Research Conference, hundreds of marijuana researchers were giggling.

It wasn’t the groundbreaking research they’d just heard—proving the ability of THC, one of the active ingredients in marijuana, to stave off HIV (or RIV in monkeys)—that did it. Nor was it the author of the study, Dr. Patricia E. Molina, who had them laughing. It was the rogue researcher daring enough to taint the victory with a harsh dose of reality: “What’s next, testing this on humans?”

As the laughter subsided and the gravity of Dr. Molina’s results sank in, reality did too. THC is one of 500 active ingredients in marijuana. And marijuana, despite many studies proving its medical value, is sill classified by the government as a Schedule I Substance. In the face of mounting evidence that it is beneficial in treating diseases ranging from Alzheimer’s and Multiple Sclerosis, it remains a controlled substance. The joke wasn’t funny so much as painfully true: proving that an illegal drug can stop a deadly disease in humans—without testing it on them—is impossible.

This bleak truth renders Dr. Molina’s discovery—at this point—futile. She’s found a key to a door that hasn’t been built.

When the journal Aids Research and Human Retroviruses published Dr. Molina’s story this week—more than three years after the study was completed—it was followed by a small amount of buzz. But it was largely overlooked by the mainstream media—perhaps because THC is already well known for treating HIV’s “wasting” symptoms, like nausea and loss of appetite.

For those well-versed in the medical marijuana community, however, the results are too powerful to ignore. Amanda Reiman, California policy manager for the Drug Policy Alliance was at the conference in 2011 when Dr. Molina presented her results. “It was groundbreaking. Everyone was in awe,” she tells The Daily Beast.

The study itself was fairly simple. For 17 months, Dr. Molina and her team at Louisiana State University administered a high concentration of THC to 4-to-6-year-old male rhesus monkeys who were RIV-positive (a virus in chimps similar to HIV), twice daily. An examination of the tissue in their intestines before and after the chronic THC exposure revealed dramatic decreases in immune tissue damage in the stomach and a significant increase in the numbers of normal cells.

Mirroring other studies that link marijuana to HIV, the study illustrates how THC works by targeting so-called “CB2” receptors in the brain. One of two known cannabinoid receptors activated by cannabinoids (terpenophenolic compounds present in Cannabis), the CB2 receptors manifest in cells connected with the immune system, such as the gastrointestinal tract and the spleen. Unlike CB1 receptors, which respond to the psychoactive qualities of THC (producing a feeling of “high”), CB2 receptors react to the therapeutic aspects of THC—for example, reducing swelling and relieving pain.

The changes that THC produces in the gut a process formally known as “microbial translocation,” isn’t as complicated as it sounds. During HIV infection, one of the earliest effects is that the virus spreads rapidly throughout the body and kills a significant part of cells in the gut and intestine. This activity damages the gut in a way that allows the HIV to leak through the cell wall of the intestines and into the bloodstream.

When THC is introduced into this environment, it activates the CB2 receptors in the intestines to build new, healthy bacterial cells that block the virus from leaking through the cell walls. In other words, the body works hard to keep bad stuff in the intestines and the good stuff out.

Put another way: HIV kills the cells that protect the walls— THC brings them back. Reducing the amount of the virus in the lower intestines could then help keep uninfected people uninfected.

The results of Molina’s study were bigger than even she imagined. “When we started the study, we thought [THC] was going to increase viral load [the amount of the HIV virus that is present in the gut],” Dr. Molina told Leaf Science. It did the opposite. “It adds to the picture and it builds a little bit more information around the potential mechanisms that might be playing a role in the modulation of the infection,” Molina said.

While some are praising Dr. Molina’s work, others take issue with classifying it as a potential way to decrease the spread of HIV. Dr. Leslie Walker, chief of the Division of Adolescent Medicine at Seattle Children’s Hospital, disagrees with the study for a variety of reasons. “One would need to actually read the study and then help them see animal model as a beginning; one cannot make the leap to preventing HIV from this type of study,” she wrote in an email to The Daily Beast, adding: “Many things can fight infection in the stomach lining that may have no impact on an overall infection.”

Dr. Kevin Sabet, Director of ProjectSAM an anti-marijuana group co-founded with Patrick Kennedy, feels equally as strong. “This study looked at THC—not marijuana—and they should not confuse the two issues,” he told The Daily Beast. “This is not about marijuana—and any characterization as such is flawed…It would be like saying people should smoke opium because Morphine might help with X condition.”

Government researchers are only a bit more enthusiastic. Dr. Carl Dieffenbach, Director of the Division of AIDS (DAIDS) of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), had just read the study when we talked. “In my mind, I don’t see its relevance to the human condition,” he said. “I’m speaking as a taxpayer and a scientist.”

Part of the issue, now that a study such as this one could technically be performed in Colorado or Washington, is the stopgap on government funding. Still, Dr. Dieffenbach, who has dedicated his life to researching ways to prevent, diagnose, and treat HIV doesn’t feel strongly about it being tested on humans. But what if it did? Should he be allowed to test it at the point, despite its illicit nature? Our colorful conversation is interrupted by an awkward response: silence. “I don’t have an opinion on that,” he says moments later.

It’s views like these that infuriate those in the drug policy world, like Amanda Reiman. “Look at the amount of research that started with animals and moved to humans. That’s the normal progression,” she says in response to critiques on the results stemming from monkeys alone. “What’s the alternative? We just give up? We’ll just never study it in humans, so we’ll never know?” she adds with audible frustration. “I’m sure the hundreds of thousands of people living with HIV would disagree with that plan. I think they’d say that ‘hey, if it worked on a monkey, let’s try it.”

The main issue Reiman highlights isn’t a lack of research—but a lack of government funding. The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) handles all of the grants to perform research with cannabis. “There is no place in our scientific protocol to investigate the benefits of illicit substances—including cannabis,” she says.

The process of obtaining research-grade marijuana is no walk in the park. Any independent U.S. group wanting to do research must first get approval from a special Department of Health and Human Services committee who reviews the project. A spokesperson for NIDA told The Daily Beast that independently-funded requests are “extremely rare.” Since 2001, only 18 requests have been submitted to the HHS review committee—15 of which have been approved. Additional approval from the Drug Enforcement Administration is required before the request makes it to NIDA’s drug supply program. Beyond being illegal, the spokesperson raises other issues with testing THC on human subjects. “It is difficult to do human research on any kind of potentially addictive drug,” the spokesperson said. “It is not ethical to give these drugs to naïve subjects, so we are often limited in the kind of clinical research we can do.”

Mason Tvert, Director of Communications for the Marijuana Policy Project (MPP), says Dr. Morina’s research is a small step forward in a race that’s already being run. “There is a growing body of evidence demonstrating the efficacy of marijuana in the treatment of a variety of medical conditions,” he tells The Daily Beast. “This is not the first time researchers have identified the benefits marijuana can provide to people with HIV.” He’s right. The findings stand on the shoulders of a great deal of research linking marijuana and HIV. In a 1999 study (PDF) by The Institute of Medicine, researchers called cannabis a “promising treatment” for “nausea, appetite loss, pain, and anxiety.”

According to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 1.1 million Americans are living with HIV—200,000 of whom are unaware of it. Each year an estimated 50,000 are diagnosed and while treatment is available, the fight for a cure rages on. In 2011 alone, 636,048 people died from AIDS.

In the wake of such studies, marijuana has become a fixture in the world of HIV treatment, something that Tvert hopes will continue. “Marijuana’s ability to stimulate appetite has proven to be a life-saver for patients suffering from HIV wasting syndrome, which can result in dangerous levels of weight loss,” Tvert says. “Research like this will continue to come out, and it is only a matter of time before more states and our federal government stop blocking HIV patients from accessing this valuable medicine. Unfortunately, there are still many people who are very sick and do not have time to wait.”

20140217-001313.jpg

Tesco Homeplus Virtual Subway Store in South Korea

Thanks;Recklessnutter

Tesco Homeplus Virtual Subway Store in South Korea

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fGaVFRzTTP4&sns=em