Monthly Archives: July 2015

Autohemotherapy

Vaniceseasonal's Blog

Thanks;ARIZONA CENTER for ADVANCED MEDICINE

Autohemotherapy is a technique used all over the world to boost the immune system. The technique is very simple. A small amount of blood is withdrawn from a vein, and re-introduced into a muscle by injection.Nov 10, 2013

 

Autohemotherapy is a technique used all over the world to boost the immune system.

autohematherapyThe technique is very simple. A small amount of blood is withdrawn from a vein, and re-introduced into a muscle by injection. This creates a tiny inflammatory response which acts very much like a wound. Muscle is slightly injured by the injection, since the needle used (no matter how small the gauge) is larger than capillaries. Injured capillaries leak calls platelets into the tissues, thus triggering the release of growth factors and inflammatory proteins. The immune system is now activated. If there are foreign proteins in the blood, these proteins are picked…

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Autohemotherapy

Thanks;ARIZONA CENTER for ADVANCED MEDICINE

Autohemotherapy is a technique used all over the world to boost the immune system. The technique is very simple. A small amount of blood is withdrawn from a vein, and re-introduced into a muscle by injection.

 

Autohemotherapy is a technique used all over the world to boost the immune system.

autohematherapyThe technique is very simple. A small amount of blood is withdrawn from a vein, and re-introduced into a muscle by injection. This creates a tiny inflammatory response which acts very much like a wound. Muscle is slightly injured by the injection, since the needle used (no matter how small the gauge) is larger than capillaries. Injured capillaries leak calls platelets into the tissues, thus triggering the release of growth factors and inflammatory proteins. The immune system is now activated. If there are foreign proteins in the blood, these proteins are picked up by antigen presenting cells and given to the T cells of the immune system to make the appropriate antibodies.

And voilà – effectively we have created a vaccine. If the proteins belong to cancer cells, we have created an effective vaccine against cancer. And because we repeat the autohemotherapy frequently, every injection contains fresh proteins. We are not risking making a vaccine to something which is no longer relevant – the major drawback of conventional cancer vaccines.

Thanks2;

The International Journal of Artificial Organs [2004, 27(9):766-771]

Type: Clinical Trial, Controlled Clinical Trial, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov’t

Abstract

Ozonotherapy is a complementary medical approach in the treatment of resistant infections, immune deficiency syndromes, orthopedic pathologies and vascular diseases. The criticism of this method is associated with potentially harmful effects of ozone on cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of ozonated autohemotherapy (O3-AHT) on the cellular response of the immunologic system represented by cytotoxic activity of natural killer cells. 12 hemodialyzed patients (8 M, 4 F) aged 64.8 +/- 7.6 years with peripheral arterial disease as the main reason for the treatment with O3-AHT were examined in a prospective, placebo controlled, single blind study. They received 9 sessions of autohemotherapy without ozone exposure as a placebo-control and subsequent 9 sessions of O3-AHT. The procedures were performed 3 times a week, just before hemodialysis session. Ozone-oxygen gas mixture with ozone concentration of 50 microg/ml produced by ozone generator (ATO3, KrioMetrum, Poland) was used during O3-AHT Natural killer cell activity was measured using lactate dehydrogenase release assay There was no statistical difference between natural killer cell activity (%) at the baseline (16.78 +/- 8.07), after nine sessions of control autohemotherapy (15.98 +/- 6.67), and after nine sessions of O3-AHT (18.26 +/- 8.82). In conclusion, our findings showed that O3-AHT in a dose of 50 mg/mL does not have any significant influence on natural killer cell function in hemodialyzed patients.


The Internet Makes You Think You’re Smarter Than You Are: An Interview with Matthew Fisher

THANKS;Scott Berinato
F1507B_ANDERSSON
The research: Yale doctoral candidate Matthew Fisher and his colleagues Mariel Goddu and Frank Keil asked people a series of questions that seemed answerable but were actually difficult. The questions concerned things people assume they know but actually don’t—such as why there are phases of the moon and how glass is made. Some people were allowed to look up the answers on the internet, while others were not. Then the researchers asked a second set of questions on unrelated topics. In comparison with the other subjects, the people who’d been allowed to do online searches vastly overestimated their ability to answer the new questions correctly.

The challenge: Does the internet make us overconfident? Are we unable to distinguish between what’s stored in our own heads and what’s in the cloud? Mr. Fisher, defend your research.

Fisher: We’ve zeroed in on access to this massive online database of information as the cause of an illusion of understanding. Even when people did searches and got irrelevant or no results, they were far more confident that they’d know the answers to unrelated follow-up questions.

HBR: What if those who got internet access just happened to know the answers to the follow-up questions better?
Randomly assigning participants to one of the two conditions took care of that worry. All the potential differences between the groups, such as previous knowledge, were then randomly distributed across the groups, so the only difference between the two groups was whether they used the internet to look up the answers to our initial questions.

In some ways this seems obvious. If I know I have access to a mechanic, I’ll be more confident that I can keep my car running.
We’re making a crucial distinction here. We didn’t see that people were more confident that they could find answers if they had access to search. We saw that people were more confident that they knew the answers—had the information in their heads—if they had access to search. It’s more like thinking you know how to fix a car if you have access to a mechanic.

How could you tell people thought they had the information in their heads? Couldn’t they have been more confident because they knew they could look things up?
In one experiment we simply asked them how well they could explain answers without using any outside sources. In another, instead of asking about their confidence, we told them that people who could give better answers would show more brain activity while answering. Then, instead of having them rank their confidence on a scale, we showed them a series of brain scans that depicted less to more brain activity. We asked them to indicate how much brain activity they’d use to come up with their answer. People who had been given access to search consistently chose images with more brain activity.

That’s clever.
Yeah, I think we made that technique up.

So what’s actually going on here?
There’s a lot of research about transactive memory partners. Take an old married couple recalling their first date. In isolation neither recalls much, but if you put their memories together, they can re-create a richer memory that’s more than the sum of each person’s fragments. Now it looks like a machine can be that transactive memory partner. You plus a search is more than you or the search. It’s just that we think it’s only us.

Plus, searching the internet is almost effortless, and it’s almost always accessible. You never face your ignorance when it’s there. Because we’re so deeply plugged into it, we misattribute the connection to knowledge to actually having the knowledge ourselves. It becomes an appendage. We like to use the term “cognitive prosthesis.”

But is it so bad to have this prosthesis? It’s like a bionic arm. Bionic arms are cool!
Except what happens when it doesn’t work? Or when you can’t access the knowledge? With some professions, we want people to be truly knowledgeable, not have a false sense of their knowledge. Surgeons, for example. At the very least we have to start structuring our world so that if such people rely on this appendage, they’re never cut off from it. Look, it’s obvious the internet has benefits. We think there’s an inherent trade-off between learning about the world yourself and storing information about the world somewhere else besides your head. The more we use the internet, the harder it will be to assess what people truly know. And that includes assessments about ourselves.

How have people reacted to your findings?
They’ve resonated a lot more than I anticipated. Because there are so few places now where we can’t access the internet, we do feel it when it happens. On a plane or in a conversation where it would be rude to pull out a mobile device, you run into this roadblock. Suddenly, we don’t feel as smart. But we never were smarter, really; we just thought that what we could search for was actually something we already knew.

So the internet makes us feel like know-it-alls? Didn’t I already know that?
Psychologists have actually studied this “I knew it all along” phenomenon. When someone with credibility explains something to a layperson, a common reaction they get is “That’s obvious” or “Oh yeah, I knew that.” So one common ploy of psychologists is to describe their findings as the exact opposite of what they are, and people will react with “Yeah, that’s right—that makes sense.” I could have played this game and said to you, “We found that people feel dumb when they use the internet, that they know nothing compared to this vast resource.” And you would have said, “Yeah, duh, of course.”

Wait, how do I know you didn’t actually do that? Which is the real finding?
You have the paper.

What made you want to study this?
It was a nice real-world way to look at what I’m most interested in: metacognitive awareness, or people’s ability to assess how well they can explain things around them. Emotional investments can give people the illusion of insight. This happens in politics a lot. You end up thinking you know arguments better than you do. Our research has shown that when college students are asked to assess their knowledge of topics, they are least accurate about how much they know about their own majors. When you’re invested in something, you like to think you know a lot more than you do.

I definitely know more about Q&As than most people!
I’m sure you think you do.

Greeks defy Europe with overwhelming referendum ‘No’

Vaniceseasonal's Blog

Thanks;Lefteris Papadimas and Renee Maltezou

By Lefteris Papadimas and Renee Maltezou
ATHENS (Reuters) – Greeks overwhelmingly rejected conditions of a rescue package from creditors on Sunday, throwing the future of the country’s euro zone membership into further doubt and deepening a standoff with lenders.
Stunned European leaders called a summit for Tuesday to discuss their next move after the surprisingly strong victory by the ‘No’ camp defied opinion polls that had predicted a tight contest.
The euro and stock prices fell sharply at the market open in Asia on Monday but then recovered some of their losses, with dealers emphasizing that markets were orderly and showing no signs of financial strain.
European stock and bond markets were expected to take a hit when they open for trading later on Monday.
In Athens, thousands of jubilant Greeks waving flags and bursting fire crackers poured into the city’s central square as official…

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Greeks defy Europe with overwhelming referendum ‘No’

Thanks;Lefteris Papadimas and Renee Maltezou

By Lefteris Papadimas and Renee Maltezou
ATHENS (Reuters) – Greeks overwhelmingly rejected conditions of a rescue package from creditors on Sunday, throwing the future of the country’s euro zone membership into further doubt and deepening a standoff with lenders.
Stunned European leaders called a summit for Tuesday to discuss their next move after the surprisingly strong victory by the ‘No’ camp defied opinion polls that had predicted a tight contest.
The euro and stock prices fell sharply at the market open in Asia on Monday but then recovered some of their losses, with dealers emphasizing that markets were orderly and showing no signs of financial strain.
European stock and bond markets were expected to take a hit when they open for trading later on Monday.
In Athens, thousands of jubilant Greeks waving flags and bursting fire crackers poured into the city’s central square as official figures showed 61 percent of Greeks had rejected a deal that would have imposed more austerity measures on an already ravaged economy.
“You made a very brave choice,” Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras said in a televised address. “The mandate you gave me is not the mandate of a rupture with Europe, but a mandate to strengthen our negotiating position to seek a viable solution.”
The vote leaves Greece in uncharted waters: risking a banking collapse that could force it out of the euro.
Without more emergency funding from the European Central Bank, Greece’s banks could run out of cash within days after a week of rising desperation as banks shut and cash machines ran dry. That might force the government to issue another currency to pay pensions and wages.
For millions of Greeks the outcome was an angry message to creditors that Greece can no longer accept repeated rounds of austerity that, in five years, had left one in four without a job and shrank the economy by a quarter.
Tsipras has denounced the price paid for aid as “blackmail”, a national “humiliation”.
“The message from the ‘No’ is that we’re not scared after all the pressure that we faced from both Europe and within,” said Stathis Efthimiadis, a 47-year-old teacher.
“We want to live fairly and freely within Europe.”
GREECE SAYS READY TO NEGOTIATE
Officials from the Greek government, which had argued that a ‘No’ vote would strengthen its hand to secure a better deal from international creditors after months of wrangling, immediately said they would try to restart talks with European partners.
But euro zone officials shot down any prospect of a quick resumption of talks, even though finance ministers were planning to meet during the week to discuss the fallout from the vote. German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Francois Hollande will meet in Paris on Monday afternoon.
“Tsipras and his government are leading the Greek people on a path of bitter abandonment and hopelessness,” Germany’s economy minister Sigmar Gabriel told the Tagesspiegel daily. He said negotiations with Athens now were “barely conceivable”.
Foreign Minister Linas Linkevicius of Lithuania, which joined the euro zone at the start of the year, said on Twitter: “Difficult to help Greece against the will of people & Government which lives in parallel World.”
Many of Athens’ partners have warned over the past week that a ‘No’ vote would mean cutting bridges with Europe and driving Greece’s crippled financial system into outright bankruptcy.
The result delivers a hammer blow to the European Union’s grand single currency project. Intended to be permanent and unbreakable when it was created 15 years ago, the euro zone could now be on the point of losing its first member with the risk of further unraveling to come.
“I believe such a result can be used as a strong negotiating tool so that Europeans can understand that we are not a colony,” said Nefeli Dimou, a 23-year-old student in Athens.
EURO EXIT ON THE CARDS
With Greece facing its worst financial crisis in recent memory, Tsipras said Athens was returning to the negotiating table with the express goal of reopening banks which have been shut for over a week with the imposition of capital controls.
The ECB, which holds a conference call on Monday morning, is likely to maintain emergency funding for Greek banks at their current restricted level and avoid the drastic measure of yanking support, people familiar with the matter said.
Even then, the banks are expected to struggle as Greeks besiege cash machines to withdraw a maximum of 60 euros ($66) daily, though government officials have vociferously denied any plans to issue a parallel currency. Fears have grown of a shortage of petrol and medicine if the cash squeeze continues.
“After the ‘big no’ it is now a race between two forces: political pressure for a deal, versus the impact of banking dysfunction within Greece,” J.P. Morgan said in a research note. “Although the situation is fluid, at this point a Greek exit from the euro appears more likely than not.”
The referendum call by Tsipras eight days ago came after months of fruitless negotiations with European and International Monetary Fund creditors since the radical leftist government took power in January. That follows seven years of deep economic crisis that has stoked violent protests and driven youth jobless rates to nearly 50 percent.
Unable to borrow money on capital markets, Greece has one of the world’s highest levels of public debt. The IMF warned last week that it would need massive debt relief and 50 billion euros ($55 billion) in fresh funds.
Opinion polls over the months have shown a large majority of Greeks want to remain in the euro. But many appear to have shrugged off the warnings of disaster, trusting that a deal can still be reached without the tax hikes and pension reform demanded by lenders and rejected by Tsipras.
“I have been jobless for nearly four years and was telling myself to be patient,” said 43-year-old Eleni Deligainni, who said she voted ‘No’. “But we’ve had enough deprivation and unemployment.”
For a graphic: http://graphics.thomsonreuters.com/15/greece/
(Additional reporting by Karolina Tagaris and Michele Kambas in Athens, Noah Barkin and Madeline Chambers in Berlin, Isla Binnie in Rome, Paul Taylor in Brussels,; Writing by James Mackenzie, Deepa Babington and Alessandra Galloni; Editing by Peter Graff, Ken Wills and Rachel Armstrong)