Category Archives: Multi-Channel Communication Technology

The 10 best computer science schools in Europe

Thanks;Sam Shead 

Published ;May 22, 2017, 4:23 PM 8,383


Technical University of Munich.

A computer science degree from a top university can help graduates land their dream job at companies like Apple, Google, and Facebook.
But which computer science courses are the best ones to try and to get onto if you want to impress employers?
Using the QS World University Rankings 2017, we took a look at the universities with the top computer science and information systems courses in Europe.
The guide is one of the most reputable sources that students turn to when deciding which universities to apply to, and employers are also likely to refer to it when deciding which candidates to hire.
It is based on academic reputation, employer reputation, and research impact. The full methodology can be read here. We looked at the overall scores, which are out of 100.
View As: One Page Slides

10. Politecnico di Milano — The Politecnico di Milano boasts 74 professors at its computer science and engineering department. The faculty achieved a QS score of 74.6 for its computer science and information systems courses.


9. Lomonosov Moscow State University — Founded in 1755 by Mikhail Lomonosov, this university is home to more than 40,000 students. The university’s computer science and information systems courses scored an impressive 74.7


8. Technical University of Munich — With its giant slides, it’ll barely feel like you’re a university student at Technical University Munich. The school achieved a score of 77.2 for its computer science and information systems courses.


7. UCL (University College London) — With strong links to cool new AI startups like DeepMind, UCL is home to one of the UK’s best computer science departments. The university scored 78.9 for its computer science and information systems courses.


6. Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) — This Swiss university specialises in physical sciences and engineering. Its computer science and information systems courses received a QS score of 80.7


The Rolex Learning Centre at the EPFL campus

5. The University of Edinburgh — Founded in 1582, the university is the 6th oldest university in the English-speaking world and one of Scotland’s ancient universities. The institution is close to billion dollar businesses like Skyscanner and FanDuel and its computer science and information systems courses scored 81.1 on the QS ranking system.


4. Imperial College London — Not quite up there with Oxbridge, but not far behind either. Imperial’s computer science and information systems courses were given a score of 83.7.


Imperial’s cyber security tuition is as good as you’d expect

3. ETH Zurich – Swiss Federal Institute of Technology — Twenty-one Nobel Prizes have been awarded to students or professors at EHT and the university’s computer science and information systems courses scored an impressive 85.4.

ETH Zurich


2. University of Oxford — Founded in 1096, the ancient university is still at the forefront of technology, with startups like DeepMind (now owned by DeepMind) having strong links to the institution. Oxford received a score of 87.8.


1. University of Cambridge — The city of Cambridge is one of the UK’s biggest technology hubs thanks in large part to its university, which appears at the top of many global university rankings. The university’s computer science and information systems course received a QS ranking of 88.9


Russia has reawakened 3 mystery satellites — and no one knows what they are for

Thanks;Daniel Brown

Published;May 20, 2017, 6:29 AM 1,583

An illustration of the SES-10 telecommunications satellite.

Three Russian satellites that were sent into low orbit in 2013 are on the move again, and no one knows what they are for, The Daily Beast reports.

Having been idle for more than a year, one of the satellites went hundreds of meters off its orbit last month to within 1,200 meters of a piece of a Chinese weather satellite that China smashed in a 2007 anti-satellite rocket test.

The maneuver, which is pretty impressive for such a small spacecraft, is also rather close by orbital standards.

No one quite knows what the satellites are for, but some experts say they could be “technology-demonstrators” or even “precursors to orbital weapons,” according to The Daily Beast.

Code named Kosmos-2491, Kosmos-2499 and Kosmos-2504, the three satellites maneuvered several times in the last three years to within a few dozen feet of their old booster shells.

This means that they could be inspection satellites that can scan and match the orbit of other spacecraft, possibly even interact with it physically for repairs, modifications or to dismantle it.

It’s also possible that these satellites could be used for warfare. “You can probably equip them with lasers, maybe put some explosives on them,” Anatoly Zak, an independent expert on Russian spacecraft, told The Beast in 2015. “If [one] comes very close to some military satellite, it probably can do some harm.”

In 2012, US intelligence completed a report analyzing “the growing vulnerability of US satellites that provide secure military communications, warn about enemy missile launches, and provide precise targeting coordinates,” anonymous sources told Reuters.

The report raised many concerns about China’s ability to disrupt satellites in higher orbits, possibly putting sensitive U.S. spacecraft at risk, the sources told Reuters.

But Russian space agency chief Oleg Ostapenko claimed in 2014 that the satellites were for peaceful purposes.

Three Reasons Why Japan Is Falling Behind in Mobile Commerce

Thanks; 
Published; April 22nd, 2017

Many see Japan as a technology leader in various industries and the country is continuing to develop innovative solutions in the digital space. However, if we look at adoption of technology on the consumer side, there is greater inconsistency than might be expected.

Euromonitor International’s 2016 Digital Consumer Index unveiled a remarkable gap between Japan’s advanced digital environment and the slow uptake of digital commerce, particularly with mobile-based purchases that are increasing rapidly in other Asian countries. Whilst mobile digital purchases registered strong 17% value growth in Japan in 2016, other Asian countries registered even stronger growth, at a minimum of 30%. The leader of mobile digital purchases, China, saw an 81% value increase in 2016. This analysis aims to explore major impediments that are keeping Japan from what should perhaps be phenomenal growth in mobile digital purchases.

mobile-purchases-asia-pacific

CHART 1 : MOBILE DIGITAL PURCHASES IN ASIA PACIFIC, TOTAL VALUE SALES, 2013-2021

1. DEMOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: LOW PENETRATION OF SMARTPHONES AMONG SENIORS

Smartphones are the catalyst for digital disruption in countries. The leading digital commerce marketplaces have developed platforms optimised for mobile apps. However, in Japan, smartphones are not as ubiquitous as one would expect. In Japan, the population aged over 60 accounts for 34% of the total population, and is characterised by low smartphone penetration. Only 28% of respondents aged over 60+ owned personal smartphones, according to Euromonitor International’s 2016 Global Consumer Trends Survey. This is extremely low compared to other Asian countries. Against the backdrop of low smartphone penetration among seniors, there also is a strong presence of feature phones that offer fewer functions in exchange for ease of use. As a result, a sizeable portion of the Japanese population is unable to take advantage of digital innovation.

CHART 2 : POPULATION AND SMARTPHONE OWNERSHIP IN JAPAN, 2016

population-smartphone-owners-japan

2. LIFESTYLE CHALLENGE: HIGH SECURITY CONCERN AMONGST JAPANESE CONSUMERS

In addition to the relatively conservative nature of Japanese consumers, there also has been a lot of media coverage on cybersecurity from the early digital era, which has made consumers concerned. For example, Consumers Affairs Agencies regularly warns against cyber-crimes due to the growing prevalence of e-commerce. As a result, Japanese consumers are highly concerned about the potential risk in online activities. In fact, only 6% of Japanese online respondents answered that they were willing to share personal information online, which was the lowest in 20 responding countries, according to Euromonitor International’s 2016 Global Consumer Trends Survey.

This hesitation toward sharing information online is especially true with mobile users. Many Japanese consumers utilise long commuting time on trains for mobile activities, but still feel uncomfortable entering their credit card information aboard a busy commuting train, afraid that other riders may see their personal information on the screen. Additionally, many are reluctant to let mobile devices store payment information, and would rather use alternative payment options, such as cash on delivery. In general, Japanese consumers are typically risk-adverse, and remain cautious about making payments on websites. Despite the rise of card payments worldwide, Japanese consumers bucked the trend, opting to more often pay for purchases with cash compared to other developed countries. Within Asia, while 85% of mobile remote orders were paid online in South Korea, only 51% were paid in Japan.

CHART 3 : WILLINGNESS TO SHARE PERSONAL INFORMATION IN ASIA PACIFIC, 2016

willingness-to-share-personal-information-japan

3. COMPETITION: MATURITY OF EXISTING SHOPPING OPTIONS VERSUS MOBILE COMMERCE

Another reason why mobile digital purchases have struggled to gain wider acceptance in Japan is due to the many other shopping options that Japanese consumers already have. One example of competition for mobile proximity payments is maturity of contactless payments using a physical card. This is because in Japan, consumers prefer to use a physical card to touch an NFC-enabled terminal rather than a device. Therefore, many mobile proximity payment brands such as Suica and Edy also offer consumers physical cards along with the digital payment option. Contactless smart cards, registered a 26% value CAGR during 2011-2016, and in 2016 Japanese consumers held an average of three contactless smart cards per person; far higher than in other Asian countries. Without a compelling reason to switch from contactless smart cards to mobile proximity payments, most consumers are satisfied with using card-based tap-and-go payments in an in-person environment.

SUMMARY

The gap between the advancement of mobile-centric products and actual adoption of mobile commerce amongst consumers is something businesses in Japan need to address. Communication with the customer or data collection made via mobile devices can be valuable, but is currently ineffective due to this gap. Over the forecast period, mobile digital purchases in Japan will continue to face these demographic, lifestyle and competitive obstacles.

However, there are positive developments that can help drive mobile commerce. For example, 2019 will be the first year with production of feature phones planned to be discontinued. Following the increase of low-cost smartphone plans, a switch from feature phones to smartphones can be expected. Moreover, solutions are being introduced in response to the high security concerns among Japanese consumers. For example, the mobile-focused fashion marketplace called ZOZOTOWN, implemented a post-pay product in 2016. GMO post-pay allows ZOZOTOWN customers to make post-pay options by cash, at convenience stores, after safely receiving their products. This is important as in Japan, credit card payments are mostly paid in full each month. Therefore the introduction of post-pay service will lower the hurdle and expand mobile remote purchases for those consumers who can only spend a limited amount of money each month, such as students and housewives. The post-pay options will support expansion of remote purchases while also meeting the demand of the cash-driven society.

Recognising the gap between digital connectivity available and digital commerce uptake, digital innovators and promoters like Suica should make concerted efforts to address concerns among Japanese consumers while promoting mobile digital purchases like Mobile Suica. Although mobile digital purchases in Japan is expected to see a strong 11% value CAGR at constant 2016 prices over the next five years, growth could be even stronger with consumers’ greater acceptance. In fact, other Asian countries are expected to see more than 20% value CAGRs. If Japan wants to remain a digital leader, its wider society needs to be incentivised to adopt mobile technologies. At the moment, it isn’t empowered – or interested enough.

 

NINE HACKERS ARRESTED IN THAILAND OVER GOVERNMENT HACKING

Thanks;REUTERS 

Published; 12/26/16 AT 10:24 AM

Cyber attacks took down government websites following strict online surveillance legislation being passed.

Hackers Hijack ISIS Twitter Accounts, Post Gay Porn

https://d.europe.newsweek.com/en/full/59121/hackers-hijack-isis-twitter-accounts-post-gay-porn.jpg?w=400&h=225&l=50&t=50&q=30
Thai police have detained nine people suspected of hacking government websites to protest against amendments to a cyber security law that critics say strengthens the authorities’ oversight of the internet.

Parliament passed legislation this month amending a cyber crime law, which rights groups said would likely to lead to more extensive online monitoring by the state.
In response, hackers launched a wave of cyber attacks last week, shutting down dozens of government websites.

The government said the websites were only down temporarily and the attacks caused minimum disruption.
Deputy Prime Minister Prawit Wongsuwan told reporters nine people had been arrested in connection with the hacking.
One of those arrested has been charged with breaking the cyber crime law, police said.
“The rest remain in custody and are being processed in accordance with the law,” police spokesman Dejnarong Suthicharnbancha told Reuters.
Thailand’s military government has increased online censorship since it seized power in a 2014 coup, in particular to block perceived insults to the royal family.
Criticism of the monarch, the regent or the heir is a crime known by the French term lese majeste, which carries a jail sentence of up to 15 years.
Since the death of King Bhumibol Adulyadej on October 13 and the ascension of new King Maha Vajiralongkorn on December 1, authorities have shut down hundreds of websites carrying what they consider to be material critical of the monarchy.
The military government is also sensitive about criticism of the 2014 coup, and a new constitution subsequently drawn up.

The government has promised to hold an election in 2017. 

The First Satellite To Ever Perform Quantum Experiments

Thanks;Sneha Susan John

chinas-jiuquan-space-launch-center.jpg

The 600 kg QUESS craft is going to be launched sometime this August. This Chinese satellite is the first satellite that will be performing quantum experiments in space. The satellite will be launched from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center. This US$100-million mission is a collaboration between the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the Austrian Academy of Sciences.

The satellite QUESS craft is going to generate entangled photons in pairs, and these photons will be blasted in China and Austria to test whether they stay together though they are distanced by 1200km. As per the quantum physics rules, these particles are linked and so even if they are a light years apart, altering the property of one changes the other as well. This quantum principle also negates with Einstein’s theory that states that nothing can travel faster than light. The team will also be performing a BELL test on the entangled photons in China and Austria. The Chinese researchers hope that transmitting photons through space where they travel more smoothly will allow communication over a greater distance.

Physicist Chaoyang Lu stated that “if the first satellite goes well, China will definitely launch more,” he added that nearly 20 satellites are required to create a quantum communications network. At this point, the QUESS craft is going to be in space for a duration of two years in order to test how it works, after which more satellites will be sent to space. If the satellite succeeds, then it might result in an encrypted, space-based internet within a decade.

As per earlier research, scientists have been able to prove the quantum communication for nearly 300kms. Now scientists are hoping that longer distance communication will also work as photons tend to travel faster in space.

Canada, Japan, Italy and Singapore are also making plans and preparing to perform quantum space experiments.

 

FBI Insists Apple Cooperate Despite Resetting iCloud Password on Shooter’s iPhone

Published;Sunday February 21, 2016 9:52 pm PST

THANKS;Joe Rossignol

iPhone-Passcode

The U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation has confirmed that it worked with San Bernardino County government officials to reset the iCloud account password on an iPhone belonging to suspected terrorist Syed Farook, according to a press statemencot obtained by Re/code.

Apple told reporters on Friday that the Apple ID password associated with Farook’s iPhone was changed “less than 24 hours” after being in government hands. Had the password not been altered, Apple believes the backup information the government is asking for could have been accessible to Apple engineers.

Nevertheless, the FBI insists that the iCloud password reset does not impact Apple’s ability to comply with a court order demanding it create a modified iOS version that allows authorities to unlock the shooter’s iPhone 5c by way of a brute-force attack.

The FBI further stated that “direct data extraction from an iOS device often provides more data than an iCloud backup contains,” and said investigators may be able to extract more evidence from the shooter’s iPhone with Apple’s assistance. Tim Cook and company, however, have thus far refused to cooperate.Even if the password had not been changed and Apple could have turned on the auto-backup and loaded it to the cloud, there might be information on the phone that would not be accessible without Apple’s assistance as required by the All Writs Act order, since the iCloud backup does not contain everything on an iPhone. As the government’s pleadings state, the government’s objective was, and still is, to extract as much evidence as possible from the phone.Cook shared an open letter on Wednesday stating that while Apple is “shocked and outraged” by the San Bernardino attacks last December, and presumes “the FBI’s intentions are good,” the company strongly believes that building a “backdoor” for U.S. government officials would be “too dangerous to create.”

The White House later denied that the FBI is asking Apple to “create a new backdoor to its products,” but rather seeking access to a single iPhone. On Friday, the U.S. Department of Justice called Apple’s opposition a “marketing strategy” in a motion filed to compel Apple to comply with the original court order.

The dispute between Apple and the FBI has ignited a widespread debate over the past six days. Google, Facebook, and Twitter have publicly backed Apple, and some campaigners have rallied to support the company, while U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump and some San Bernardino victims have sided with the FBI.

Apple now has until February 26 to file its first legal arguments against the court order.

Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.

 

Bringing down barriers in the Digital Single Market: No roaming charges as of June 2017

Thanks;European Commission – Press release Database/Nathalie VANDYSTADT &Marie FRENAY

@Strasbourg, 27 October 2015

The European Commission has welcomed today’s vote by the European Parliament’s plenary to adopt the agreement reached in June to end roaming charges by June 2017 and to set net neutrality rules for the first time in EU law.

Commission Vice-President Andrus Ansip, responsible for the Digital Single Market, said:
“The voice of Europeans has been heard. Today’s vote is the final result of intense efforts to put an end to roaming charges in the European Union and to safeguard the open internet. As from mid-June 2017, Europeans will pay the same price to use their mobile devices when travelling in the EU as they do at home. And they will already pay less as from April 2016. This is the culmination of hard work by the Commission, and in particular by former Vice-Presidents Viviane Reding and Neelie Kroes, to tackle high roaming charges. This is not only about money; this is about bringing down barriers in the Digital Single Market. Today’s achievement is a first step towards a Telecoms Single Market. More work will need to be done to overcome national silos and address challenges such as spectrum coordination. We will go further as early as next year with an ambitious overhaul of EU telecoms rules. We count on the support of the European Parliament and Member States to make this happen”.

Commissioner Günther H. Oettinger, in charge of the Digital Economy and Society, said:
“Today’s agreement shows that the European Union can deliver tangible results to improve the daily life of Europeans. Roaming charges will be soon old memories and we will get for the first time ever net neutrality rules in EU law. These rules protect the right of every European to access the content of their choice, without interference or discrimination. They will avoid fragmentation in the single market, creating legal certainty for businesses and making it easier for them to work across border. We would like to thank the European Parliament, especially the rapporteur Pilar del Castillo, for its hard work to get this important deal for European people and businesses. Digital challenges need strong action at European level, and we should continue in this direction to create a Digital Single Market”.

More information

The speeches given this morning by Vice-President Ansip at the European Parliament can be found here.

An updated fact sheet with questions and answers can be found here.

Commissioner Oettinger will participate in a press conference at 15.30 CET hosted by Member of Parliament Pilar del Castillo (broadcast on EbS).

Background

The European Commission presented its proposal for a telecoms single market (‘Connected Continent’) in September 2013 (press release). The European Parliament voted on its first reading of the draft legislation in April 2014 (press release). The Council adopted a mandate to negotiate in March 2015 under the Latvian Presidency (press release). Negotiations led to an agreement on 30 June (press release) which was formally adopted by the Council on 1 October and by the European Parliament today.

The measures adopted today will be completed by an ambitious overhaul of EU telecoms rules in 2016. This reform will include a more effective EU-level spectrum coordination. Creating the right conditions for digital networks and services to flourish is a key objective of the Commission’s plan for a Digital Single Market presented in May 2015.

Infographics Net Neutrality

Infographics Roaming

The Internet Makes You Think You’re Smarter Than You Are: An Interview with Matthew Fisher

THANKS;Scott Berinato
F1507B_ANDERSSON
The research: Yale doctoral candidate Matthew Fisher and his colleagues Mariel Goddu and Frank Keil asked people a series of questions that seemed answerable but were actually difficult. The questions concerned things people assume they know but actually don’t—such as why there are phases of the moon and how glass is made. Some people were allowed to look up the answers on the internet, while others were not. Then the researchers asked a second set of questions on unrelated topics. In comparison with the other subjects, the people who’d been allowed to do online searches vastly overestimated their ability to answer the new questions correctly.

The challenge: Does the internet make us overconfident? Are we unable to distinguish between what’s stored in our own heads and what’s in the cloud? Mr. Fisher, defend your research.

Fisher: We’ve zeroed in on access to this massive online database of information as the cause of an illusion of understanding. Even when people did searches and got irrelevant or no results, they were far more confident that they’d know the answers to unrelated follow-up questions.

HBR: What if those who got internet access just happened to know the answers to the follow-up questions better?
Randomly assigning participants to one of the two conditions took care of that worry. All the potential differences between the groups, such as previous knowledge, were then randomly distributed across the groups, so the only difference between the two groups was whether they used the internet to look up the answers to our initial questions.

In some ways this seems obvious. If I know I have access to a mechanic, I’ll be more confident that I can keep my car running.
We’re making a crucial distinction here. We didn’t see that people were more confident that they could find answers if they had access to search. We saw that people were more confident that they knew the answers—had the information in their heads—if they had access to search. It’s more like thinking you know how to fix a car if you have access to a mechanic.

How could you tell people thought they had the information in their heads? Couldn’t they have been more confident because they knew they could look things up?
In one experiment we simply asked them how well they could explain answers without using any outside sources. In another, instead of asking about their confidence, we told them that people who could give better answers would show more brain activity while answering. Then, instead of having them rank their confidence on a scale, we showed them a series of brain scans that depicted less to more brain activity. We asked them to indicate how much brain activity they’d use to come up with their answer. People who had been given access to search consistently chose images with more brain activity.

That’s clever.
Yeah, I think we made that technique up.

So what’s actually going on here?
There’s a lot of research about transactive memory partners. Take an old married couple recalling their first date. In isolation neither recalls much, but if you put their memories together, they can re-create a richer memory that’s more than the sum of each person’s fragments. Now it looks like a machine can be that transactive memory partner. You plus a search is more than you or the search. It’s just that we think it’s only us.

Plus, searching the internet is almost effortless, and it’s almost always accessible. You never face your ignorance when it’s there. Because we’re so deeply plugged into it, we misattribute the connection to knowledge to actually having the knowledge ourselves. It becomes an appendage. We like to use the term “cognitive prosthesis.”

But is it so bad to have this prosthesis? It’s like a bionic arm. Bionic arms are cool!
Except what happens when it doesn’t work? Or when you can’t access the knowledge? With some professions, we want people to be truly knowledgeable, not have a false sense of their knowledge. Surgeons, for example. At the very least we have to start structuring our world so that if such people rely on this appendage, they’re never cut off from it. Look, it’s obvious the internet has benefits. We think there’s an inherent trade-off between learning about the world yourself and storing information about the world somewhere else besides your head. The more we use the internet, the harder it will be to assess what people truly know. And that includes assessments about ourselves.

How have people reacted to your findings?
They’ve resonated a lot more than I anticipated. Because there are so few places now where we can’t access the internet, we do feel it when it happens. On a plane or in a conversation where it would be rude to pull out a mobile device, you run into this roadblock. Suddenly, we don’t feel as smart. But we never were smarter, really; we just thought that what we could search for was actually something we already knew.

So the internet makes us feel like know-it-alls? Didn’t I already know that?
Psychologists have actually studied this “I knew it all along” phenomenon. When someone with credibility explains something to a layperson, a common reaction they get is “That’s obvious” or “Oh yeah, I knew that.” So one common ploy of psychologists is to describe their findings as the exact opposite of what they are, and people will react with “Yeah, that’s right—that makes sense.” I could have played this game and said to you, “We found that people feel dumb when they use the internet, that they know nothing compared to this vast resource.” And you would have said, “Yeah, duh, of course.”

Wait, how do I know you didn’t actually do that? Which is the real finding?
You have the paper.

What made you want to study this?
It was a nice real-world way to look at what I’m most interested in: metacognitive awareness, or people’s ability to assess how well they can explain things around them. Emotional investments can give people the illusion of insight. This happens in politics a lot. You end up thinking you know arguments better than you do. Our research has shown that when college students are asked to assess their knowledge of topics, they are least accurate about how much they know about their own majors. When you’re invested in something, you like to think you know a lot more than you do.

I definitely know more about Q&As than most people!
I’m sure you think you do.

ISIS using Facebook, Twitter to recruit Muslim girls in UK

THANKS;

s2-reutersmedia

The three friends, two aged 15 and one 16, left their east London homes last week and caught a Turkish Airlines flight to Istanbul without telling their families.

Islamic State is using social media and the promise of adventure to lure British Muslim girls to join its cause, an anti-extremism think tank said on Monday, as police attempt to trace three London schoolgirls believed to be heading to Syria.

The three friends, two aged 15 and one 16, left their east London homes last week and caught a Turkish Airlines flight to Istanbul without telling their families.

The Quilliam Foundation said there had been a concerted effort from Islamic State to use websites like Twitter, Ask.fm and Facebook to groom young girls into believing they have a moral duty and obligation to join the militant group.

For girls from conservative Muslim families in Britain, who may be denied the same opportunities as their brothers and male peers, messages offering the chance to “do something with your life” can prove tempting, said managing director Haras Rafiq.

“Many of these girls are not allowed out, or to do certain things in society,” Rafiq told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

“When they are online, they are being targeted with messages of empowerment… ‘Come and do your bit… Reject Western values — you’ll never get what you want there'”.

Islamic State, the militant Sunni Muslim group, declared an Islamic caliphate across parts of Syria and Iraq last summer. It has killed thousands in what the United Nations has called a reign of terror.

The Quilliam Foundation estimates some 600 people from Britain, around 10 percent of them female, have travelled to Syria and Iraq to join the conflict, mostly with Islamic State.

Rafiq said girls targeted by Islamic State recruiters were being misled by the promise of adventure and excitement abroad.

A manifesto attributed to an-all female branch of Islamic State and translated into English by the think tank said girls may marry at nine, the “most pure” will be wed by 17 and all women should consider motherhood the purpose of their existence.

“These girls are going abroad because they are not really achieving what they consider to be much in Britain,” he said.

“But we want to inform young girls that the way [Islamic State] are targeting them and the story they’re selling them is not reality.”

In a report released in November 2014, The Quilliam Foundation said female supporters of Islamic State were using social media to persuade European Muslims to travel to Iraq and Syria with “the promise of an Islamist utopia”.

SPY CHIEF NAMES NORTH KOREAN BEHIND HACK

Thanks;The Daily Beast
Jan,7 2015
Updated19 minutes ago

Director of National Intelligence James Clapper has named the North Korean official who allegedly ordered the hacking attack on Sony Pictures, The Daily Beast’s M.L. Nestel reports.


Clapper said at a cybersecurity conference in Manhattan that Gen. Kim Youn Chol, his counterpart in North Korea, must have ordered the cyberattack. Clapper said he met Kim during a tense 12-course meal in Pyongyang last year while he was retrieving two American prisoners. “Kim was a four-star general in charge of the Reconnaissance General Bureau. The RGB is the organization responsible with the overseeing attack against Sony.” Clapper added that the two got in a heated exchange that involved both men jabbing fingers into each other’s chests.

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